Keyboard repair

History and Preservation Issues

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mrr19121970
Vic 20 Nerd
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Re: Keyboard repair

Postby mrr19121970 » Fri Oct 28, 2016 12:49 pm

She doesn't mind as long as I remove the dishes 1st. But last time there was room for a c128 and the dishes too.

Before and after pics of a dishwasher mainboard...


attachment-1.jpeg


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joshuadenmark
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Re: Keyboard repair

Postby joshuadenmark » Fri Oct 28, 2016 11:43 pm

The dishwasher uses salt, could this on a longer term, corrode some of the more fragile parts?
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mrr19121970
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Re: Keyboard repair

Postby mrr19121970 » Sat Oct 29, 2016 12:57 am

I only wash once, and then I guess time will tell?

eslapion
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Re: Keyboard repair

Postby eslapion » Sat Oct 29, 2016 7:41 am

joshuadenmark wrote:The dishwasher uses salt, could this on a longer term, corrode some of the more fragile parts?

I don't know about salt but I know the large capacitors used on VIC-20, C64 and C128 computers are NOT rated for temperatures above 100C so the drying cycle at the end is very detrimental to them as well as the joystick, IEC and cartridge port connectors (plastic parts).

Having the board rinsed in flux remover at room temperature is considerably more expensive but 100% safe... unless of course you set the liquid on fire...

mrr19121970 wrote:She doesn't mind as long as I remove the dishes 1st. But last time there was room for a c128 and the dishes too.

Commodore 8 bit computers contain lead in all solders because they were made long before RoHS regulations were passed.

I suspect you got a toxic lunch with your dishes... :shock:
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